Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Anything but Traditional: Oklahoma Brides and Grooms Choose Nontraditional Ceremonies

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Anything but Traditional: Oklahoma Brides and Grooms Choose Nontraditional Ceremonies

Article excerpt

Ah, wedding music: Wagner's Bridal Chorus, known familiarly as "Here Comes the Bride," Mendelssohn's Wedding March - Big and Rich's Save a Horse, Ride a Cowboy?

Ron Ponder, co-owner of Thunderbird Chapel with his wife, Cheryl, said one couple chose the raucous Save a Horse as their processional music. Perhaps less surprisingly, several just-weds select Boomer Sooner to cap-off their wedding ceremony at the Norman chapel.

"We've had several that broke the mold," said Ponder.

Another time, he said, the disc jockey came up to him concerned about using music by a hard-core heavy-metal band. Ponder said the actual song turned out to be fairly mellow.

"The main thing about wedding ceremonies nowadays, I think, is that there aren't really any hard-and-fast rules," Ponder said.

Nontraditional music selections aren't the only way Oklahoma brides and grooms are putting their own stamp on that important day, following some trends outlined in a recent Wedding Channel survey.

Some 63 percent of brides told the Wedding Channel they would ask a male best friend to be their chief attendant, and some Oklahoma couples are following suit.

Trisha Hollars, office manager at Brookside Wedding Chapel in Oklahoma City, said Brookside offers a fairly traditional ceremony, but some brides do ask a male lifelong friend to stand up for them.

"I have had some brides that their best friend was a man," she said. "That's only happened a couple of times, like a childhood friend they grew up with."

Ponder said he has had several ceremonies where the bride and groom were up on the stage, with the guest minister below them.

"I had a bride say, 'Well, all my guests came to see me. They really didn't come to see the minister,'" he said. "I'm not sure what the ministers think about this, but I would say that's a trend."

Ponder said couples these days feel freer to tailor the ceremony to their wishes, from writing their own vows to brides using more color in their dresses.

For some, that includes asking an ordained family member to officiate at their wedding. …

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