Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Continuous Learning Calendar Yields Student Improvement

Newspaper article THE JOURNAL RECORD

Continuous Learning Calendar Yields Student Improvement

Article excerpt

At times the challenges faced in building a model urban school district can inadvertently overshadow the many good things happening everyday in classrooms across our district.

For example, the state's top academic high school is part of the Oklahoma City Public Schools district -- Classen School of Advanced Studies. One of only eight elementary schools to score a perfect 1,500 on the state's API test is an Oklahoma City Public School -- Nichols Hills.

And one of our very serious experiments is yielding results that could have implications well beyond a single school. As other children headed out last week, school continued for the elementary students attending our district's first continuous learning calendar pilot program at Sequoyah Elementary School. You will be pleased to know the program has gone very well in its first year.

Sequoyah convened its first day of a continuous learning calendar pilot program in early August. After researching the subject, Sequoyah's principal, DeAnn Davis, concluded a continuous learning calendar could help her students produce better results by changing the learning achievement patterns. Scheduling a number of smaller breaks throughout the year enables the students to retain information at a higher rate.

One misnomer about a continuous learning calendar is the impression that students spend more time in school. Students on a continuous learning calendar receive the same number of instructional days as students on a traditional calendar. The difference is how the instructional days are scheduled throughout the year.

Students on a continuous learning calendar attend four nine-week sessions with three three-week breaks and a six-week summer vacation.

Under the continuous calendar, Sequoyah teachers are able to offer more instruction to their students. Review time is reduced because students retain more of the information taught because of the shortened breaks. After these short breaks, teachers are able to continue the learning process where they ended before one of the short breaks. …

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