Okla.-Based US Fleet Tracking CEO Taking Path to Success

Article excerpt

When business productivity is flagging, a couple's fidelity is lacking or time is of great importance, there's a piece of Oklahoma- grown technology to provide a remedy.

Jerry Hunter, chief executive officer of US Fleet Tracking, never dreamed of the moral and ethical implications his products would encounter; he's a software engineer with a fascination and flair for technology.

But as his business has grown, so have the uses for his tracking and navigational devices, which are following the movements of thousands of people and vehicles around the world at any given moment.

In a month, about 200 of his devices will trace the whereabouts of multimillion dollar-salaried athletes at the Super Bowl, followed by 800 units at the Winter Olympics in Vancouver, where his technology will ensure the timely arrival of the world's best athletes at their events. Across the nation every day, business owners are tracking the movements of their vehicle fleets, knowing if employees go directly to their job sites or drive 30 miles away for a three-hour lunch.

"The worse the economy gets, the better we do because companies have to cut down on wasted fuel and increase the productivity of their employees," Hunter said.

Hunter's business has grown by leaps since he began about five years ago. In 2008, his gross earnings were $27.6 million, he said. For 2009, he estimates $75 million to $85 million. By this spring, Hunter and his 20 employees plan to move into a new 18,000-square- foot office building on N. May Avenue.

US Fleet Tracking has a network of 350 dealers around the world that literally peel off his devices' labels and replace them with their own for private branding. Not too many are within Oklahoma's borders, but his customers range from midtown Manhattan and Los Angeles to France, Germany, Australia and Iceland. The majority of his customers are in the commercial realm, but he has a variety of other users. About 8 to 10 percent of his business is with parents who are tracking their teenagers using the technology; another 8 percent is government users, such as drug task force agents. About 7 percent is the "cheating spouse market" - suspicious significant others wanting to follow their hunches.

Hunter's latest invention, which came out about five months ago, is theV5 Copilot, a device that wraps several functions into one. Its primary use is for a business owner charged with the efficiency of a fleet of vehicles and their drivers. …

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