Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Mom and Bisquick Both Known to Make Life a Little Bit Easier

Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Mom and Bisquick Both Known to Make Life a Little Bit Easier

Article excerpt

For most of us, the name "Bisquick by Betty Crocker" conjures up images of a smiling lady in an apron, holding a big bowl and a wooden spoon or rolling pin. The words "just like Mom (or Grandma) used to make" come to mind. Bisquick has been around since 1931. According to Advertising Cookbooks, a website specializing in cookbooks printed by food manufacturers, a General Mills executive was taking a train trip in 1930 and struck up a conversation with a railroad chef about how he made fresh biscuits so quickly. The chef told him his secret was to mix flour, baking powder, salt and lard in the correct proportions, and keep it chilled until he needed a batch of biscuits. Add water, pat it out, and into the oven they went in no time.

The executive took this idea back to the firm, and soon they came up with a recipe using hydrogenated shortening rather than lard, which would be shelf-stable without refrigeration. Meant for making biscuits in a flash, Bisquick was born. The ingredients listed on the original package were flour, vegetable shortening, phosphate, sugar, dry skim milk, salt and soda.

As the use of the product expanded from biscuits to baking of all types, the recipe was altered in the 1960s to include buttermilk.

Today, the dairy has disappeared and the ingredients are enriched bleached flour, partially hydrogenated soybean and/or cottonseed oil, leavening (baking soda, sodium aluminum phosphate, monocalcium phosphate), dextrose and salt. Light and gluten-free versions of Bisquick are available as well.

Bisquick has remained a household staple for over 80 years for a reason. It's familiar and convenient, it tastes good, and the tested recipes provided on the box or in numerous Bisquick cookbooks (and today, on the website at www.bettycrocker.com) are easy enough for kids to help with and just about infallible.

To serve the women in your life a special breakfast or brunch treat on Mother's Day, the trove of Bisquick recipes is a great place to start putting together the menu.

All recipes from Betty Crocker. …

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