Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Working-Class Whites Crucial for Obama ; Economically Stressed Workers View Romney More Favorably Analysis

Newspaper article Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)

Working-Class Whites Crucial for Obama ; Economically Stressed Workers View Romney More Favorably Analysis

Article excerpt

The latest Washington Post-ABC News poll highlighted just how much the coalitions of the two political parties have changed over time and continue to shift during Barack Obama's presidency. What advisers to the president and Mitt Romney are trying to calculate is how that may affect the Electoral College. The poll's results were not truly surprising, but they captured something that reflects current social realities. The survey found that the most economically stressed white voters in this country view Mitt Romney far more favorably than the president when it comes to handling the economy.

A labor official emailed me the day the story by my colleagues Karen Tumulty and Jon Cohen appeared, saying: "A Democratic president is losing the jobless... FDR must be spinning in his grave."

The truth is Democratic presidential candidates have been losing among white voters, particularly those without college degrees, for years. Obama wasn't the first, but he has clearly struggled as much as, or more than, any of his predecessors in attracting support from that group.

That fact was underscored by Democratic primaries in Kentucky and Arkansas this week. Obama lost roughly 40 percent of the Democratic vote in essentially uncontested events, just as he had in Oklahoma earlier in the year. Although those results drew attention and commentary, they, too, were hardly a surprise.

Four years ago, Obama was wiped out in those states during his nomination battle against Hillary Rodham Clinton. In the general election, he fared worse than the 2004 Democratic nominee, John Kerry, had done in 2004 in an arc of heavily white counties running south and west from West Virginia through Arkansas to Oklahoma, even though virtually all other counties in the country gave him a higher percentage of the vote than the Democrats got in 2004. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.