Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Mafia Arrests: Four of the Most Famous Mob Busts in History

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Mafia Arrests: Four of the Most Famous Mob Busts in History

Article excerpt

The FBI announced the biggest anti-Mafia operation in its history Thursday. In all, 127 people allegedly linked to the mob were arrested. Here are the stories of four of the biggest mobsters ever arrested.

The FBI announced the biggest anti-Mafia operation in its history Thursday. In all, 127 people allegedly linked to the mob were arrested. Here are the stories of four of the biggest mobsters ever arrested.

#4 Al Capone (1899-1947)

Al Capone was brought down not for murder nor for organizing the St. Valentine's Day Massacre. In 1931, Capone was sentenced to 10 years in prison for something less associated with violent criminal masterminds: tax evasion. Capone had never filed an income tax return, and investigators found proof that he received millions in income from illegal activities.

Capone began serving time in the Atlanta U.S. Penitentiary in 1932. It was known as one of the toughest prisons in the country, and Capone spent his time cobbling shoes. In 1934 he was transferred to Alcatraz, where he was cut off from contact with the outside world. At Alcatraz, Capone's health declined due to complications from syphilis, which he had contracted as a youth. He spent his last year at Alcatraz in the prison hospital, before being transferred to the Federal Correctional Institution at Terminal Island, Calif. to serve a one-year misdemeanor sentence. When freed in 1939, Capone had little power within organized crime. His physical and mental health continued to decline, until he died in 1947.

#3 Charlie 'Lucky' Luciano (1896-1962)

Crime boss Charlie Luciano redefined New York City organized crime in the 1930s, pushing for its infiltration of legitimate businesses and for a more orderly chain of command. Although he was a murderer, he was convicted of leading of a prostitution ring in 1935.

Luciano was sentenced to 30 to 50 years in prison, but received a shorter term in exchange for helping the U. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.