Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Japan Nuclear Crisis: US Announces Evacuation Options

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Japan Nuclear Crisis: US Announces Evacuation Options

Article excerpt

The US embassy in Tokyo has urged American citizens within 50 miles of the threatened plant to relocate and announced it would help US citizens evacuate the country by plane.

After reports that some spent fuel rods at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant may now be completely dry, the US embassy on Thursday urged American citizens within 50 miles of the threatened plant to relocate and announced it would help US citizens evacuate the country by plane.

"The Department of State has authorized the voluntary departure, including relocation to safe areas within Japan, for family members and dependents of US Government officials who wish to leave northeast Japan. The US Government is also working to facilitate the departure of private American citizens from the affected areas - that is a 50-mile radius of the reactor," announced US Under Secretary of State Patrick Kennedy.

The recommendations followed US Nuclear Regulatory Commission chairman Gregory Jaczko's Wednesday testimony to a congressional subcommittee, at which he warned that radiation levels were very high and said his organization believed that all the water in the spent-fuel pool at the No. 4 reactor likely had run dry, an extremely dangerous situation.

Representatives of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), the plant's operator, denied Mr. Jaczko's claim and Japanese officials did not change the government's current 20-kilometer (12-mile) evacuation zone for those living near Fukushima.

The conflicting views mark a departure as the US had been telling its citizens to listen to Japanese authorities until now.

Meanwhile, a new round of emergency efforts to control the escalating disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant began Thursday, including using a water cannon and talk of progress on a new power line to the plant as hopeful ways to control the rising temperatures at all six reactors. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.