Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Syria Protests: Is There a Peaceful Path to Democracy?

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Syria Protests: Is There a Peaceful Path to Democracy?

Article excerpt

Can Syria make a transition to democracy without facing the deadly battles now seen in Libya, or the repression in Bahrain? Yes, if enough leaders within Syria show vision and restraint, and if they are open to some outside mediation from South Africa, Turkey, and the US.

Syria's pro-democracy movement has brought huge crowds onto the streets, challenging the 48-year rule of the country's Baath Party. Already, more than 200 people have been killed in clashes between protesters and the security forces. Can Syria make a transition to democracy without facing the deadly battles now seen in Libya, or the repression in Bahrain?

Yes, if enough leaders within Syria show vision and restraint, and if they are open to some outside mediation.

The alternative would likely be a spiral into sectarianism, further violence, and social-political breakdown (in Arabic, fitna). This is terrible to contemplate - for Syria's own 22 million people and for all their neighbors. Syrians know well how Iraq had its own fitna after the 2003 ouster of Saddam Hussein. They hosted more than a million of the refugees from that violence.

So how might outsiders help Syria make real, speedy progress toward democracy without running the risk of fitna?

Convincing power-holding minority to loosen grip

First, we should understand that, in today's Syria as in pre- 2003 Iraq, the country's one-party rule has a deeper reality: near- complete domination by a single, minority demographic.

In Baathist Iraq, that minority was the country's Sunni Arabs. In Syria, it is the Alawites who make up an even smaller proportion of the population - less than 13 percent - while a clear majority of Syrians are Sunnis. (The citizenry also includes many Arab Christians and ethnic Kurds, along with members of other minority groups.)

One big challenge, as in post-Saddam Iraq or pre-democracy South Africa, is how to persuade the (often fearful) members of the power- holding minority to loosen their grip and move speedily to a one- person, one-vote system.

An equally difficult challenge is how to persuade the (often angry and vengeful) members of the majority to be inclusive and even generous as they proceed toward winning their democratic goal.

South Africa's transition as model

Finding visionaries on both sides to do that will not be easy. Syrians need both a Nelson Mandela and a Frederik de Klerk who, as in apartheid South Africa, could negotiate a path to democracy for Syria.

Of course, it isn't that simple. During South Africa's largely peaceful transition to democracy, each of those two leaders had a broad and fully functioning political movement behind him. The democratization deal that they negotiated was a wide-ranging agreement between two big movements, not just between two men.

In Syria, it is hard to imagine the minority Baath Party backing an overture to leaders in the majority Sunni community. …

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