Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

6 - Yes, 6 - Finalists for the 2011 National Book Award for Young People's Literature

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

6 - Yes, 6 - Finalists for the 2011 National Book Award for Young People's Literature

Article excerpt

It was apparently a mistake when they announced six titles this year instead of the usual five nominated for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature. But then, said Harold Augebraum, executive director of the National Book Foundation, "We decided that it was better to add a sixth one as an exception, because they're all good books." Which of these six finalists do you think will win the 2011 National Book Award for Young People's Literature on Nov. 17?

It was apparently a mistake when they announced six titles this year instead of the usual five nominated for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature. But then, said Harold Augebraum, executive director of the National Book Foundation, "We decided that it was better to add a sixth one as an exception, because they're all good books." Which of these six finalists do you think will win the 2011 National Book Award for Young People's Literature on Nov. 17?

#6 "Chime," by Franny Billingsley

(Dial Books) Briony Larkin is only 17 but she's already facing a world of trouble. She must keep the fact that she is a witch secret from the rest of the world, even as she battles the forces disrupting her village and threatening the health of her disabled identical twin sister. This fantasy story aimed at teens received praise from critics for its mysterious aura and for its wit.

#5 "My Name Is Not Easy," by Debby Dahl Edwardson

(Marshall Cavendish) Amiq, Luke, Chickie, Junior, Bunna, and Sonny are Alaskan natives who have been taken from their families and forced to attend Catholic boarding schools. Based on some ugly history of the 1960s, this work of fiction is aimed at young adults and addresses questions of race and justice.

#4 "Inside Out and Back Again," by Thanhha Lai

(Harper) Saigon is the only home young Ha has ever known. But it's 1975 and the Communists are coming closer, the Americans have mostly left, and bombs can be heard outside the city. …

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