Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

An Appreciation: Longtime Monitor Journalist Guy Halverson

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

An Appreciation: Longtime Monitor Journalist Guy Halverson

Article excerpt

Guy O. Halverson was a Monitor correspondent with a varied writing career that spanned more than 35 years. His award-winning journalism led the way against drunk driving and Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos. Who wants to become a lawyer when you can report on Watergate?

Guy O. Halverson, who passed on Nov. 29, was a longtime Monitor correspondent who leaves a file of some 2,500 articles written on a vast range of topics over a 35-year career.

His first major success was "Stop the Drunk Driver," his 10-part series published in 1970. It won an Alfred P. Sloan Award, including a significant cash prize. The foundation honoring him said the series "placed before the American public a state-by-state assessment of one of the grimmest problems facing the nation" and called his articles "a major contribution to public understanding of the problem caused by the drunk driver."

He spent much of his career doing business and financial reporting, but his great love was politics, his wife, Rosemarie, remembers. "The highlight of his career was covering the Watergate hearings." During that period, as the nation saw the presidency of Richard Nixon unravel on live television, one of Guy's particular coups was his interview with Martha Mitchell, the colorful and outspoken wife of President Nixon's attorney general, John Mitchell.

As a member of the editorial board in the 1980s, he pushed to keep the Monitor out front on what was then an issue of great import to the United States: the future of US bases in the Philippines and what he came to see as wrongheaded support of the Ferdinand Marcos regime. The Philippine-American writer Peter Bacho, whom Guy cultivated as a Monitor op-ed writer and as a source for the Monitor's own editorials, remembers Guy's gracious manner, soothing voice on the phone (they never actually met face to face), and subtle sense of humor. …

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