Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Awaiting Next Move of Serbs, Kosovars Must Now Plan Own A Failure by the World Powers to Sway Milosevic Could Next Force a Restive Province to React. but How?

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Awaiting Next Move of Serbs, Kosovars Must Now Plan Own A Failure by the World Powers to Sway Milosevic Could Next Force a Restive Province to React. but How?

Article excerpt

Still stinging from a brutal police crackdown that claimed scores of lives, the ethnic Albanians of Kosovo province have for the moment withdrawn from the streets and are awaiting international help.

"Now we have to go back to our homes and try to protect our women and children," says Mustaf Kulinxha as he makes his way down a snow-covered street in downtown Pristina.

Mr. Kulinxha is part of a 90 percent ethnic Albanian majority in the southern Serbian region of Kosovo, where police crackdowns over the last 10 days left at least 80 dead. Police said the raids - in which women and children were killed - were necessary to contain the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA), which has been characterized as a terrorist group by the international community. Rather than protest in the streets, as they did March 9 in a 50,000-strong peaceful demonstration (some reports made it twice that number), the ethnic Albanians appear to be waiting for the Serbs' next move. The six-nation Contact Group on the former Yugoslavia agreed March 9 to give Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic 10 days in which to begin seeking a political solution to the Kosovo crisis or risk the imposition of tougher sanctions than those already in place. US Balkans envoy Robert Gelbard arrived March 10 in Kosovo after meeting with President Milosevic in Belgrade. The outcome of the 10-day period will be crucial in shaping future ethnic Albanian policy, says Ylber Hysa, a political editor at Koha Ditore, an independent ethnic Albanian newspaper in Pristina. If no significant progress is made, he says, the Albanian leadership with have to consider a new approach to the problem. "Now it's Mr. Milosevic's and the international community's turn to act," says Mr. Hysa. "If Milosevic does not take this seriously, then the {ethnic} Albanians will definitely come to the stage." The ethnic Albanians in Kosovo have grown used to waiting. Since Milosevic stripped them of autonomy in 1989, they have practiced peaceful resistance, largely by boycotting most Serbian institutions and setting up an underground government and schools. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.