Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Letters

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Letters

Article excerpt

Quebec sovereignty not 'the abyss'

It is my impression that the opinion piece "Quebec Secession Revisited" (Nov. 23) omitted a few crucial elements.

First, the scenario whereby Quebec would unilaterally declare its complete independence from Canada is very unlikely. Only a handful of separatists support the notion of a Quebec currency, for example, or the end of all political ties with Canada. Premier Lucien Bouchard's recent visit to the US reaffirmed that the people of Quebec are very interested in maintaining commercial exchanges with Americans. The fact is the hard-line approach to secession has always been rejected by the vast majority of Quebec nationalists, who instead seek a certain political autonomy coupled with strong economic ties to Canada. This has been labeled sovereignty-association. It describes the Parti Quebecois's project more accurately than apocalyptic images of "monumental and anguishing legal, financial, and political problems, and the threat of prolonged friction and even violence." Second, even though economic concerns should be at the heart of any nationalistic project and "they are currently an integral part of the separatist discourse," other important variables should not be ignored. Sovereignty is not pursued primarily as a way to make Quebec richer, but as a way to give shape to the identity of its people. It is not a project that seeks to destroy Canada, but one that seeks to build Quebec on solid grounds. Finally, while uncertainty is obviously a part of the debate, the simple fear of the unknown does not constitute a sufficient argument against Quebec's case for sovereignty. Many people, it seems, should be reminded that change can be good. History has proved it many times. It is also important to realize that the current Canadian situation is highly problematic. Regardless of political allegiances, polls usually show a vast, pan-Canadian rejection of the status quo, hence the numerous attempts to amend the Constitution in recent years - all failures. …

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