Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Taming the Workplace Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Taming the Workplace Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

Article excerpt

I have a good friend who really likes his job - except for one thing. The owner of the company manages it by shouting and screaming.

It's not a technique recommended by any of the current business gurus I've come across. And my friend would not recommend it either. In fact, those angry bursts often lead to poorly thought out decisions, which then have to be worked around carefully in order not to harm the business in progress.

Unfortunately, lots of people are in work situations where displays of anger and temper are common. And mostly, if they want to keep their jobs, the only option is to take it. Or is it? True, responding in kind simply proves self-destructive. Sullen silence is unproductive. And just taking it wears a person out. But it is possible to rise in spiritual protest. And, through this, to achieve a better working environment. What is "spiritual protest"? How do we go about it? In order to engage in this kind of protest, we need to ask ourselves, "Whom do I acknowledge as God? My boss, or the divine Spirit?" It may be simple to say "Spirit." But then we need to examine our thinking more closely. Do I think my life - and the quality of my life - are determined by my boss or by God? Who am I most dependent on? Who has the greatest power? The Bible is a progressive revelation of the omnipotence of good. In addition, the Bible illustrates over and over again that God, infinite good, is an effective, ever-present help. Take Daniel's situation, for instance (see Dan., Chap. 6). He found himself in a pretty dicey work environment. He had the king's ear, but that made other people jealous. So they devoted their time to finding a way to get rid of him. Daniel was not in favor simply because he flattered the king, though. His work was excellent. In fact, they couldn't bring any work-related charge against him. So they formed a plan that deceived the king. They had him sign a law that they knew would make Daniel pay the ultimate penalty - being thrown into a den of man-eating lions. But Daniel was a man who served God even more than he served the king. He knew God was omnipotent. …

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