Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Hudson Artists Saw America as a Paradise

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Hudson Artists Saw America as a Paradise

Article excerpt

The Hudson River School artists were a romantic bunch. Considered America's first landscape painters, these men - and several women - wanted to present the land in the New World and all it had to offer: its beautiful countryside, sunrises, sunsets, seasons, and sometimes even its dangers.

Amid these grand scenes of nature, you might be able to spot a fisherman, a hunter, or native American in the foreground, dwarfed by the expanse, a symbol of man's relationship to the natural world around him.

The Worcester (Mass.) Art Museum is displaying 75 of these early- to mid-19th-century paintings, works by the likes of Frederic Edwin Church, Thomas Cole, and Worthington Whittredge. The exhibition's title - "All That is Glorious Around Us" - is taken from a quote by writer James Fenimore Cooper in 1868 that seems to epitomize the movement: We claim for America the freshness of a most promising youth, and a species of natural radiance that carries the mind with reverence to the source of all that is glorious around us. …

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