Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

The Great Escape Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

The Great Escape Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

Article excerpt

If you believe a lot of ads, escape is just a quick plane flight away. I used to escape every chance I got. I don't mean taking a vacation - I ran away from problems.

If I didn't like where I lived, I moved. If I didn't like my job, I quit. Did someone hurt me deeply? I made sure they never saw me again, even if they wanted to apologize. I prided myself on being a sort of Great Houdini of the soul - an escape artist.

But I often escaped out the back door of one problem only to find the front door of another. After a while, some "new" problems began looking pretty familiar. As lots of people have observed, not learning our lessons the first time can mean encountering new opportunities to learn them - until we do. Recently, I read something written by the 19th-century religious leader Mary Baker Eddy: "History repeats itself; to-morrow grows out of to-day. But Heaven's favors are formidable: they are calls to higher duties, not discharge from care; and whoso builds on less than an immortal basis, hath built on sand" ("Christian Healing," pg. 1). As a young adult, I encountered a bad set of circumstances. My problems appeared so insurmountable that I made plans to commit suicide. Fortunately, my very intuitive roommate suddenly felt impelled to go home to see if I was all right. I was very grateful because, I realized, I loved being alive! But having failed in that dramatic escape, I chose another. Quit an interesting job and moved across the country. Stopped eating properly. Lost a lot of weight. Although my physical condition eventually improved, the feeling that I'd been betrayed and misled persisted for years. Convinced that the mere remembrance of that emotional pain would protect me from future mistakes, I nevertheless ended up in circumstances far more hopeless. The consequences of having made wrong choices were even more severe. I knew I didn't want to be jerked around by the damaging emotions I'd felt before. But now I had family, financial, and professional responsibilities. I couldn't just take my name out of the phone book and disappear into the sunset. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.