Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Demand Grows for Alternative Certification

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Demand Grows for Alternative Certification

Article excerpt

Emily Feistritzer has been collecting data on alternative ways to certify teachers for the classroom since 1983. Once scorned by the teaching establishment, alternative certification is now available in 41 states, along with the District of Columbia. It allows prospective teachers to bypass traditional four-year undergraduate programs in favor of more on-the-job training. Features of these programs - such as mentoring and extensive classroom teaching experience - are spilling over into traditional schools of education.

A former teacher, Dr. Feistritzer currently directs the National Center for Education Information in Washington, where she spoke with the Monitor. Excerpts follow:

On the value of alternate routes: There's a demand for alternate routes at the state and local levels, because there are shortages in the classroom; but you also have a demand from people who want to become teachers later in life. There is a new market, and this demand has forced institutions to be more responsive. On prospects for change: I feel increasingly optimistic, because different groups and factions are much more open to the possibility that there are people out there that might be open to teaching - people who have raised their families, people from other careers or from retirement, liberal-arts graduates who decide after they've gotten their first degree that they might like to teach. There is an openness to designing programs for these post-baccalaureate people now, where there wasn't five or 10 years ago. On early opposition: When New Jersey started developing alternative routes for bringing people into teaching {in 1984}, there was a tremendous backlash from the traditional colleges of education, less so from the unions. The very notion of developing alternative routes for nontraditional candidates for teaching met with much criticism without much content. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.