Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Russian Prestige Sinks with Sub ; the Stranding of One of Russia's Newest, Best-Equipped Nuclear Vessels May Force Military Rethink

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Russian Prestige Sinks with Sub ; the Stranding of One of Russia's Newest, Best-Equipped Nuclear Vessels May Force Military Rethink

Article excerpt

The stricken nuclear submarine trapped on the sea bed above the Arctic Circle was the pride of Russia's nuclear forces and a symbol of its hope to maintain nuclear parity with the United States. No matter how the accident plays out, it is seen as a major blow to Russia's prestige and may force the country to scale back its ambitions as a global military power.

Russian Navy ships yesterday were at the scene, but the prospects for a rescue appeared difficult. The Kursk, an Antyei-class attack submarine with 107 crew members on board, lay on the floor of the Barents Sea in water more than 150 feet deep. One Norwegian report put the vessel more than 450 feet down.

Russian Navy commander Admiral Vladimir Kuroyedov said the Kursk apparently had been involved in a major collision and sustained serious damage.

"Despite all the efforts being taken, the probability of a successful outcome from the situation with the Kursk is not very high," Mr. Kuroyedov told the ITAR-Tass news agency. Russian television earlier reported water had gushed through the torpedo tubes and flooded the front of the vessel.

The Kursk was taking part in military exercises, the largest the Russian Navy has conducted in years, at the time of Sunday's accident.

The Russian Defense Ministry said the Kursk was not carrying nuclear weapons and insisted its two reactors had been shut down safely. There was no danger of hazardous radiation leaks into the surrounding Arctic ecosystem, a ministry spokesman said.

Russia's aging cold-war-era submarine fleet has been dogged by accidents - the consequence of Soviet technological corner-cutting in its race to keep up with the US - and the collapse of funding, morale, and discipline since the demise of the USSR in 1991. But the Kursk was one of the Russian Navy's newest ships, commissioned in 1995 and intended to demonstrate Moscow's continuing claim to great- power status on the high seas.

In April, President Vladimir Putin spent a night on the Karelia, a ballistic- missile sub from the same naval base, Severodvinsk on the White Sea, and praised the submarine fleet as the mainstay of Russia's nuclear deterrent. "Russia needs armed forces, and the Northern Fleet is one of their main elements," Mr. Putin said.

On Friday, the Kremlin Security Council decided to make deep cuts in Russia's strategic nuclear arsenal in order to fund other branches of the fraying and cash-strapped military forces. But experts say the accident with the Kursk - however it plays out - will stand as a stark warning to Russian military planners to scale down their ambitions in the future.

"This is one of the best and one of the newest models, and what happened is an accident that was bound to happen because of lack of proper finances," says Vladimir Urban, a naval expert with AVN, an independent military news agency. …

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