Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Eggs Are All They're Cracked Up to Be

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Eggs Are All They're Cracked Up to Be

Article excerpt

The oval is considered nature's most perfect shape. The egg goes even further. It not only pleases the eye, but the palate as well. But even if they came triangular or square (ouch), eggs would still have universal appeal to cooks.

Imagine the epicurean world without them: Flans would flounder, puddings would plummet, souffls would sink, and breakfast would be a bomb. Bacon and kumquats? No way. Sausage and M&Ms? Ain't gonna happen. Steak and pickles. I don't think so. Zucchininog? I'll pass.

Wherever birds and mankind have flocked together, eggs have been on the menu. Although most of the world now gets its eggs from domesticated chickens, it's not always been so. In Evelyn Waugh's "Brideshead Revisited" upper-class Oxford boys supped on freshly gathered speckled plover eggs. Then there's Martha Stewart, who fancies the pale greenish-blue eggs she gathers from her impeccably feathered flock of Chilean aracaunas.

It has been said that you can't sell a New Englander a white egg, or anyone else in the US a brown one. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.