Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Lynch's Twisty Map to 'Mulholland Drive'

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Lynch's Twisty Map to 'Mulholland Drive'

Article excerpt

Whether you love his films or hate them - and plenty of moviegoers fall into each camp - you have to admit that David Lynch is a true original. A homegrown surrealist who sees few boundaries between reality and fantasy, he shocked audiences with "Blue Velvet," charmed them with "The Straight Story," and transfixed them with "Twin Peaks," to mention just a few of his accomplishments.

Lynch sets out to do all those things at once in his new picture, "Mulholland Drive," which opens this week after hotly debated screenings at the Cannes and New York film festivals. If ever a movie had a split personality, this one does - part murder mystery, part Hollywood satire, part erotic thriller, and sheer hallucination all the way.

The intricate story is impossible to summarize, but here's a hint of what goes on. After losing her memory in a car crash, a young woman (Laura Herring) drifts into a Los Angeles apartment complex where she meets a wannabe actress (Naomi Watts) who helps her find out who she is and why her purse is crammed with cash. Living nearby is a movie director (Justin Theroux) who has to deal with a cheating wife and a gang of Mafia enemies who want to control his latest production.

Also on hand are a cynical cop, a washed-up actor, a lecherous swimming-pool cleaner, a mobster who's fussy about his espresso, a hit man who can't shoot straight ... and a long list of others so numerous that "Twin Peaks" seems underpopulated by comparison.

In short, "Mulholland Drive" has more twists and turns than the L.A. street it's named after. This is because Lynch conceived the story as a miniseries that would develop its ideas over many months. The reason it's coming to theaters instead of TV sets is that ABC didn't like the pilot he presented to them. In fact, he told me in a conversation at Cannes last spring, "They hated it." The project might have withered on the vine if European producers hadn't stepped in with enough funding to shoot additional scenes and transform it into a feature film. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.