Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Color-Blind Admissions

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Color-Blind Admissions

Article excerpt

When a large and predominantly white public university such as Texas A&M can successfully increase its enrollment of minority students without considering race as an admissions factor, other schools should pay close attention.

Former CIA Director Robert Gates, who became president of A&M in 2002, managed to do just that. The number of black freshman enrolled at the school in 2004, compared with the year before, was up by 35 percent - from 158 to 213. The number of Hispanic freshmen increased by 26 percent - from 692 to 865. Not bad for a university that began as a military-training college, and, like many southern colleges, didn't admit blacks until the early 1960s (though it did admit Hispanics).

True, those jumps are out of a total freshman class of 7,068, and A&M, like other large Texas universities, has a long way to go to more fully reflect the state's racial population makeup.

Ever since Mr. Gates took office, he's been under pressure from Texas lawmakers and civil rights groups to diversify. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.