Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

NBA: Why Aren't You Watching? ; the Finals Go to Game 7, Owners and Players Agree on a New Labor Contract, but Playoff Ratings Are Sagging. Is the Fan Base Eroding?

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

NBA: Why Aren't You Watching? ; the Finals Go to Game 7, Owners and Players Agree on a New Labor Contract, but Playoff Ratings Are Sagging. Is the Fan Base Eroding?

Article excerpt

A players' brawl started the NBA season and a labor brawl, solved by a buzzer-beating agreement Tuesday, closes it. Somewhere in- between, the league played basketball, filled its arenas at record rates, bickered over collective-bargaining issues, and lost much of its luster in the process.

With the NBA Finals wrapping up Thursday night, professional basketball boasts a mixed bag: Full houses offset by abysmal national TV ratings, the measures by which major professional sports leagues gauge success. The Detroit Pistons-San Antonio Spurs series has been such a snooze that NBA executives have taken to bragging that it's not as ignored as the 2003 Spurs-New Jersey Nets Finals, the lowest-rated in league history.

Even before the dismal TV performance for the finals, NBA interest plummeted this spring. Ratings fell across-the-board for network-televised playoff games. On ABC, for example, playoff ratings dropped 26 percent heading into the finals.

"The NBA is lacking chemistry and the style and personalities that drove it during the 1980s and 1990s," says David Carter of The Sports Business Group, a consulting firm in Los Angeles. "And I don't think fans like the defensive struggles and pace of the game right now. That's why the bloom is off the rose."

League executives and analysts agree that the fading fortunes of two big-city teams, the New York Knicks and Los Angeles Lakers, also erode national interest and cost the NBA viewers in key markets.

San Antonio and Detroit, which battle in the seventh and deciding game Thursday night, boast stellar players. But not one has the allure of a Shaquille O'Neal or LeBron James. In addition, both finalists play a bruising brand of basketball, fine for purists but low on aesthetics for casual fans.

Until the new labor agreement was completed, much of the post- season - the high point of any sports league's year - consisted of verbal sparring between Commissioner David Stern and Billy Hunter, the head of the players' association.

Mr. Stern and the owners had threatened to lock out players if the current deal, which expires at the end of the month, lapsed without a revised agreement. Now the players and owners have another six years of assured labor peace. The deal raises the minimum age to enter the NBA draft to 19, shortens maximum player contract lengths to six years, increases the percentage of revenues shared with players to 57 percent, and allows for four random drug tests per year.

As Mr. Hunter put it at a Tuesday press conference before Game 6 of the Finals, the two lead negotiators "began to ratchet up the rhetoric" before they backed "away from the abyss." Stern added that the resolution allowed the league to "avoid the apocalypse."

With a new labor deal in place, players and owners must now confront other image issues. …

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