Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Give Up Those Age-Old Concepts ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life

Newspaper article The Christian Science Monitor

Give Up Those Age-Old Concepts ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life

Article excerpt

Wherever you turn these days, you seem to be assaulted by the topics of age and aging. They're the topics of discussion in many communities and often featured in the local press. They're the focus of debates and conferences, national and global.

Among recent topics are the protracted retirement years ahead for post World War II "baby boomers" and the anxiety felt among seniors about their increasing age-related health needs.

But these concerns don't have to dominate people's lives. Take my friend Ed, who is a marvel. Though he is well advanced in years, he is productive, energetic, caring, and seems on the cutting edge of everything. Ed is an active Christian Scientist. He prays regularly. He is a thinker, a spiritual investigator. He knows all about current events. He looks into everything. You want to know about computers, websites, phone systems? He will explain.

Ed helps neighbors by harvesting their fruit from the uppermost boughs. He rides white-water rapids. Cycles in the mountains. For me, he epitomizes Mary Baker Eddy's statement, "We live in an age of Love's divine adventure to be All-in-all" ("The First Church of Christ, Scientist, and Miscellany," p. 158).

I find it wonderful to think of age as a period marked by the development and unfoldment of good. But what is "All-in-all"? To me that phrase is about finding God to be everything, for everyone, everywhere, at every moment. At all times, in all places, for all of His children, God is revealing the reality of spiritual being. And this can lead us to look at age differently.

The Bible is a good starting point. After discussing what a search to understand God entails, the book of Job talks about the spiritual rewards, including the comforting assurance that "thine age shall be clearer than the noonday; thou shalt shine forth, thou shalt be as the morning" (Job 11:17).

Vitality, energy, buoyancy result from realizing that God is the only source of good, and that your very being flows from that source. …

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