Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Hey, Sbm: What's Your Rmv? Recipe for Happiness Is in This Alphabet Soup, Author Says

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Hey, Sbm: What's Your Rmv? Recipe for Happiness Is in This Alphabet Soup, Author Says

Article excerpt

SBF LOOKING for SBM?

Forget about the MBA and the BMW.

It's his RMV that counts.

Let Larry Davis, Ph.D., explain it all to you.

Davis, 47, is an associate professor of social work and psychology at Washington University. He is also the author of a new book, "Black and Single: Meeting and Choosing a Partner Who's Right for You," due out next month from The Noble Press ($10.95).

"It's a book about sex, money, power and love," Davis said.

He targeted his book at single blacks because there aren't enough self-help books focused on their unique dating problems.

"Most books are written for a mainstream audience," Davis said. "Most books written by blacks, even about blacks, are for white people."

The book doesn't tell single black females (SBFs) anything they don't already know about the lack of eligible single black males (SBMs). There are, Davis notes, only seven black men for every 10 black women. That's because of a high rate of infant mortality, imprisonment and homicide among black males that "continues to resemble that of a country at war."

Many of those men are considered unsuitable as romantic partners by black women because they don't have enough money or aren't educated, Davis said.

Add to those discouraging facts the following:

Most black people are single.

Two out of three black marriages end in divorce.

Only one divorced black woman in three ever remarries.

More black men are in prison than in college.

Black men have been losing economic ground relative to everyone else, including black women, making them less desirable.

What to do?

Stop leaving romance to chance, Davis said.

Contrary to what your pheromones or your horoscope may tell you, romance isn't random. If it were, America would actually be a melting pot, not stratified by economics, race, religion or education, Davis said. He likes to test his theory on his college students. He asks for a show of hands if they are dating someone of a similar religion, race, economic group, educational background, etc. …

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