Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Drug May Prevent Newborns' Jaundice

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Drug May Prevent Newborns' Jaundice

Article excerpt

In a development that may lead to prevention of most neonatal jaundice, researchers at the Rockefeller University in New York have developed a preventive drug that could eventually be given to all newborns.

Jaundice, the most commonly treated medical condition in newborns, occurs when bilirubin, a toxic yellow pigment, is produced faster than an infant's liver can remove it from the bloodstream, causing the skin to appear yellow. In severe cases, the buildup of bilirubin can damage the brain and central nervous system.

Dr. Attallah Kappas said, "The importance of our studies, from our point of view, is that they demonstrate an entirely new means of addressing the problem of newborn jaundice in a preventive manner." He is a Rockefeller University researcher who led the team that developed the drug, as reported in the current issue of the journal Pediatrics.

Kappas said that drug therapy, because it was based on the principle of prevention, might be preferable to the standard treatment, phototherapy, which is administered after the buildup of potentially harmful levels of bilirubin and requires the baby to be kept in the hospital for several days. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.