Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Nixon's Final Book Slams Clinton Criticism Centers on Handling of Somalia, Bosnia

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Nixon's Final Book Slams Clinton Criticism Centers on Handling of Somalia, Bosnia

Article excerpt

HARDLY HAS Richard M. Nixon been laid to rest than his last thoughts are being given new life. His final book, to be released Monday, accuses President Bill Clinton of foreign policy failures and challenges the nation to find a 21st century "mission beyond peace."

"The reality of peace is that it is only the foundation upon which a more prosperous and just world can be built," the nation's 37th president writes in his 10th book. "This effort will require just as much determination, vision, and patience as the defeat of communism required."

His advice to Clinton, who often accepted Nixon's guidance on foreign policy and who eulogized him Wednesday: "The United States must lead. . . . The future beyond peace is in our hands."

To a nation facing what he termed a "deadly spiritual deficit," Nixon writes: "We must marshal the same resources of energy, optimism and common purpose that thrive during war and put them to work at home and abroad during an era when our enemy will be neither communism nor Nazism but our own self-defeating pessimism."

Part the memoirs of an elder statesman, part the point-scoring of a master politician and part the crystal-ball-gazing of a global strategist, "Beyond Peace," published by Random House, embraces the events, policies and personalities that have shaped the second half of this century and analyzes prospects for the post-Cold War world.

It is his analysis of Clinton's policies that gives the book its edge. He describes a famous Clinton campaign slogan - "It's the economy, stupid" - as "good politics but poor statesmanship."

"There is a world of difference between campaigning and governing," he writes. "We cannot have a strong domestic policy unless we have a strong foreign policy. We cannot be at peace in a world at war, and we cannot have a healthy economy in a sick world economy."

Whether on Clinton's handling of Somalia, his involvement in Bosnia, his enthusiasm for the "Partnership for Peace" between NATO and the nations of Eastern Europe, the staffing of his Cabinet, or his approach to health care reform, the Nixon book frequently chides the president. …

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