Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Mike Post Makes Television Hum Now Composer Is Creating the Music for an Entire Cable Network

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Mike Post Makes Television Hum Now Composer Is Creating the Music for an Entire Cable Network

Article excerpt

MIKE POST, TV's most prolific composer, just might want to write every single note of music you hear on television.

Post came pretty close to it this season, with his music airing on 11 first-run shows. More recently, he agreed to create the theme music for an entire cable network, NBC-owned America's Talking, which makes its debut Monday in some areas. (It may be carried in the future by local cable companies.)

"I have the perfect job description," he said.

"I only work for my friends, I hire my friends, and I make friends with the people I hire."

Of course, when your friends are TV producers like Steven Bochco or Stephen J. Cannell or Dick Wolf, you stay busy. And Post has kept busy since writing his first theme, for "Toma" in 1973.

"I don't go to work until Bochco, Cannell or Dick Wolf goes to work," he said.

"All the rest of the time, I just walk around humming, just sort of hearing tunes in my head. But I never write 'em down or catalog 'em.

"I just hum a lot and I play a lot, because I work a lot. So I always want there to be something there when I push the button.

"Somebody asked me the other day about writer's block and I said, `What's that?'

"He said, `You know what it is.' I said, `No, I don't, and I don't want to know what it is. Get that word away from me!' "

The eminently hummable Post has become TV's master of tone. Nobody writes more TV scores; that's a fact. But it's arguable, too, that nobody writes better.

Consider, please, the ebullience of "The Rockford Files" theme, the tender "Hill Street Blues" theme, the joyous Top 10 hit "Believe It Or Not" from "Greatest American Hero," the - ominous "Law & Order" theme (that's HIS thumb popping the guitar strings) and the "NYPD Blue" theme that slides from white-hot drums to melancholy Irish pipes.

That's not to mention "L.A. Law," "Blossom," "Doogie Howser, M.D.," "Magnum, P.I.," "Silk Stalkings," "The Renegade" and others too numerous to list.

"I write the first thing that happens. I never look back," said Post, who readily admits to being a Type A personality. …

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