Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Election-Year Politics and Douglas Macarthur

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Election-Year Politics and Douglas Macarthur

Article excerpt

WITH GEN. DOUGLAS MacArthur, hyperbole had a way of repeating itself.

In April 1951, President Harry S Truman fired MacArthur for his dark attitude toward the adminstration's limited-war policy in Korea.

The last straw for Truman was a letter to a Republican congressman - a letter in which MacArthur declared, "There is no substitute for victory."

MacArthur should have known better than to put words on paper to a Republican congressman. He had done so once before, in 1944 - and it had cost him a shot at the White House.

In that wartime election year, many Americans thought MacArthur would make a splendid president. A spate of wartime books with titles like "MacArthur the Magnificent" burnished the general's reputation; Robert McCormick's Chicago Tribune all but worshipped MacArthur, as did the Hearst papers.

Small wonder that a MacArthur-for-President movement bubbled among some Republicans, especially in the conservative Midwest. A few of the faithful entered MacArthur's name in the primaries.

In April, MacArthur finished third in Wisconsin primary, and in Illinois, he led the ticket in an uncontested race.

Then disaster struck, in the form of the congressman - an obscure Nebraskan named Albert L. Miller.

On April 14, in the heat of the primary season, Miller gave the press copies of his correspondence with the general. …

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