Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

More Than Just Munchies Soda, Snack Machines Produce Revenue for Variety of Projects

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

More Than Just Munchies Soda, Snack Machines Produce Revenue for Variety of Projects

Article excerpt

Those soda and candy vending machines in high school corridors are more than a service to thirsty students. They add financial fizz to school budgets.

"That extra money is really nice to have," said Kyle Thrasher, principal at Francis Howell North High School. Profits from the seven or eight soda machines and several candy machines goes into a soda account, which is money for student purposes that the school would not otherwise have, Thrasher said.

Most recently, some of the money was used to give every student a spiral calendar planner. The idea, Thrasher said, was to help them learn the importance of planning for the future.

At Fort Zumwalt South High School, the Pepsi, Coke and candy machines brought in several thousand dollars last year.

Principal Tom Byrnes said, "We put the money into a student fund. The only stipulation is that it is spent on students and student programs."

Among the uses are ice cream or pizza parties for the 100 Percent Club, for which students are eligible if they turn in all their work for the first quarter.

The money also funds field trips for students whose grades and attendance records are good enough to exempt them from final exams and for special programs for such groups as the math club, which have no fund-raising source of their own, Thrasher said.

The machines are available before and after classes but not during the school day, he said. Byrnes said the school kept the price at 55 cents, which gives the school enough money to work with.

At Orchard Farm High School, profits from the candy machines go to the school, said principal Lanny Hradek. The only soda machine for students is in the student store, which sells school supplies and other items and is operated by the business marketing club.

At Duchesne High School, administrator Charles Nolan said the 60-cent soda machine in the hall near the gymnasium is regarded more as a service to students than as a money-maker, and profits go to the athletic department to help buy uniforms and equipment. …

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