Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Grandkids Hard to Reach by Phone or in Flesh

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Grandkids Hard to Reach by Phone or in Flesh

Article excerpt

Dear Abby: In response to "Disappointed in Cincinnati" re: gifts for grandchildren, the writer asks for "the gift of yourself."

The suggestion: to "drive over once in a while, or call to say hello."

We tried "driving over" twice, and were greeted with icy coldness - not even invited inside.

We phoned and asked (whichever grandchild answered): "How are you?"

Answer: "Fine."

Q: "How's school?"

A: "Fine."

Q: "I heard you were in a recent swim meet. How did you do?"

A: "Fine."

Q: "How was your day today?"

A: "Fine."

This, from grandchildren ages 12 to 16, who once liked us better than peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.

Abby, where did we go wrong? SAD GRANDPARENTS DANVILLE, CALIF.

You didn't go wrong - your grandchildren have become grand-ADOLESCENTS. This is the way many teens talk to everyone except their contemporaries. The next time you call, speak to the parents and ask for their help in bridging the age gap. If they can't help you, they can probably sympathize - because parents often endure the same treatment. The good news: It's only a phase.

*****

Dear Abby: "Elderly but Able," the man who claims that he has been driving for 70 years and never had an accident, is to be commended. But it doesn't necessarily mean that he is a good driver. It may mean that other drivers have quick reflexes. …

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