Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

An Arthritis Remedy Soaked Up through the Grapevine

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

An Arthritis Remedy Soaked Up through the Grapevine

Article excerpt

Q: I have tried the raisins-and-gin remedy for arthritis to no avail. It didn't work for me at all. However, after pouring almost half a bottle of gin on those raisins, there was no way I would throw them out to the birds.

After keeping them refrigerated for some time, I found the greatest solution. Tell your readers to try gin-laced raisins in their oatmeal for breakfast. I am still enjoying mine every morning. M'm'm!

A: You're not the only person who didn't find gin-soaked raisins helpful for arthritis. Gay says, "The raisins do not relieve arthritis - they help by tasting so good you forget the pain for a while. Your advice to let the gin evaporate defeats this benefit. Put the raisins and gin in a covered container, keep in refrigerator and, when raisins are depleted, replace them in the same gin. Eventually you get a liquid that is delicious, intoxicating, and much less expensive than Drambuie."

We can't recommend Gay's recipe because we don't want to encourage alcohol consumption. In the original raisin recipe, a box of golden raisins is covered with gin that is allowed to evaporate. Laboratory testing revealed that the daily dose of nine raisins contains only a trace of alcohol.

We have no way to know if gin-drenched raisins help anyone's arthritis, because there are no scientific studies of this treatment.

*****

Q: Abbott Labs has been on a full-scale ad campaign pushing Hytrin as a solution to the symptoms of enlarged prostate. Unfortunately, it is an expensive medication over the long haul.

Is it true that another blood pressure medication, prazosin, which is like Hytrin, will also work for prostate enlargement?

Since prazosin is available in generic form, it is far less expensive.

A: Our urological consultant, Dr. Richard Kane, assures us that prazosin will work for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) even though the FDA has not approved it for this use. …

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