Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

St. Louis Ranks High in Crimes Numbers Skewed by Population Loss, Boundaries, Officials Say

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

St. Louis Ranks High in Crimes Numbers Skewed by Population Loss, Boundaries, Officials Say

Article excerpt

Although St. Louis' crime numbers are dropping, the city remains near the top of national crime rankings based on 1994 FBI figures released Sunday.

Among cities with a population of more than 250,000, p St. Louis ranked second behind Newark, N.J., for crimes per 100,000 people. At the same time, the FBI report shows that St. Louis had a 3 percent drop in violent crime and a 1 percent drop in property crimes from the previous year.

Outgoing city Police Chief Clarence Harmon says he's not surprised by the city's high rank. "We're losing population at such a prodigious rate that our relative standing doesn't change, even though we're having some dramatic declines in crime," he said.

In murders, St. Louis saw a 7 percent drop last year from 1993 - but still ranked third, behind New Orleans and Washington. In the category of property crimes, St. Louis was third behind Tampa, Fla., and Miami.

U.S. News & World Report ranked the cities, based on an analysis of the FBI's new crime figures.

The city Police Department's figures for the first 10 months of 1995 show even sharper drops compared to the same period in 1994 - about 20 percent fewer murders and a 10 percent to 11 percent drop in crimes against people, a department spokesman said.

City officials say St. Louis' national ranking is unfairly skewed because most other cities have larger geographic areas within their boundaries. St. Louis has not changed its boundaries since 1876, when it split from St. Louis County.

According to the FBI figures, overall crime in Missouri rose 5 percent in 1994, and 0.6 percent in Illinois.

Nationally, the FBI said the total number of crimes against people and property dropped 1 percent - led by an 8 percent drop in violent crime in cities with more than a million residents.

But arrests of youths under age 18 for violent crimes surged by 7 percent. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.