Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Foo Fighters Reviews from across the Country of the Band That Performs at 7:30 P.M. Tuesday, March 26 at the American Theatre

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Foo Fighters Reviews from across the Country of the Band That Performs at 7:30 P.M. Tuesday, March 26 at the American Theatre

Article excerpt

The Dallas Morning News

(Sept. 14, 1995):

Kurt Cobain might have been Nirvana's mouthpiece, but Dave Grohl's atomic drumming gave the trio its claws. While Mr. Grohl has abandoned the drums in the wake of Nirvana's 1994 demise, he hasn't quit making music with an edge.

Performing Tuesday night before 950 fans at Deep Ellum Live with his new quartet, the Foo Fighters, he made a loud and eloquent argument that there is life after the death of Mr. Cobain.

Singing and slashing away at his oddly shaped electric guitar, Mr. Grohl steered bandmates Pat Smear (guitar), Nate Mendel (bass) and William Goldsmith (drums) through an hour-long set of volcanic punk-pop. The tunes, taken mostly from the Fighters' recent self-titled debut album, made no great departure from Nirvana's metal-edged assault. But these weren't blatant rehashes, either.

In songs such as "For All the Cows" and "Good Grief," the group hit on a magical equation of raging noise and pretty melodies: While early punk bands sneered at well-crafted hooks and choruses (the Sex Pistols even fired their first bassist for liking the Beatles), the Fighters strive to be accessible.

For "This Is the Call," they reworked a catchy guitar riff from Day Tripper, while the mid-tempo shuffle "Big Me" sparkled as brightly as an old gem from Tin Pan Alley. But unlike many pop-minded songwriters, Mr. Grohl challenged fans to read their own meaning into opaque lyrics such as "This is a call to all/mass resignation."

Freed from the drum kit that trapped him on stage in Nirvana, he embraced his new job as rock `n' roll showman: Thrashing his hair in circles and bouncing across stage like a kid on a trampoline, Mr. Grohl made even the Foo Fighters' darkest tunes seem exuberant.

The show's only drawback was his singing -- too often he simply mimicked Mr. Cobain's raspy screams, adenoidal whines and slurred words. As much punch as the Fighters packed, Mr. Grohl still needs to find his own voice.

--Thor Christensen

The Houston Chronicle

(September 12, 1995)

Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters wants to get one thing straight. In the song `'I'll Stick Around," from Foo Fighters' self-titled debut album, the former drummer with Nirvana rants, over and over, "I owe you nothing. …

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