Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Canadian Fans Don't Take a Shine to Golden Brett

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Canadian Fans Don't Take a Shine to Golden Brett

Article excerpt

It was only a matter of time. Brett Hull has alienated an entire country.

Fans in Canada's capital of Ottawa let Hull have it Sunday at Corel Centre, where he led Team USA to a 5-2 victory over Team Russia and a berth in the finals of the World Cup of Hockey.

The sellout crowd of 18,500 was decidedly anti-American, cheering the Russians and booing the Americans. Hull was the fans' No. 1 target, not to mention the No. 1 star for Team USA. They booed Hull when he touched the puck. They cheered when he lost it. They booed when his mug appeared on the scoreboard. They cheered lustily when Darius Kasparaitis decked him with a mid-ice check. They chanted "traitor, traitor" and "Brett Hull Stinks," or a reasonable facsimile thereof. All this because Hull wears the red, white and blue rather than the maple leaf in international hockey competition. "That's the only reason," Hull said. "Because I was born in Canada and play for the U.S. It's still not very nice. . . . It bothers me. I'm a hockey player and I consider myself an ambassador of the game. I'm not the type of player to do anything to make them boo. I'm there to entertain them." But to the Canadians, he's in the wrong uniform. The son of Hockey Hall of Famer Bobby Hull, a good Canadian farm boy, Brett Hull was born 32 years ago in Belleville, Ontario, a three-hour drive from Ottawa. But his mother, Joanne Robinson, is an American. Hull cast his lot with Team USA in 1986. Former Team USA coach Dave Petersen invited him to try out for the U.S. national team to play in the World Championships in Russia. Hull was a sophomore at the University of Minnesota-Duluth at the time, and had not turned professional. "Dave Petersen and (Team Canada coach) Dave King were in the stands, and Dave King must have decided I wasn't any good," Hull said. "Dave Petersen asked me to go to the world championships. They gave me a chance and you have to remain loyal to that." Hull explained this on a Canadian national television network interview last week, upsetting Canadians who became upset when Hull said he'd never play for Canada. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.