Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Portraying Hillary as 'Soft' Radical Brock's Book Is Surprisinly Even-Handed

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Portraying Hillary as 'Soft' Radical Brock's Book Is Surprisinly Even-Handed

Article excerpt

THE SEDUCTION OF HILLARY RODHAM = A biography by David Brock

452 pages, Free Press, $26

LAST FEBRUARY, author David Brock went to a bookstore where Hillary Rodham Clinton was autographing her book, "It Takes A Village." He stood in line for hours, and when he finally reached the front, he identified himself and asked when he could interview her for the biography he was writing. As he described it, her response was: " `Probably never,' she answered with a wry edge." Who can blame her? Brock's credits include "The Real Anita Hill," a hardball look at Clarence Thomas' accuser that established him as a writer with a definite right-wing agenda, and his analysis of the first lady was not likely to be kind. The surprise of "The Seduction of Hillary Rodham" is that, while it is far from a song of praise, its treatment is largely even-handed. Brock lays out his thesis this way: "Hillary's story is that of an intelligent, talented, ambitious, and very determined woman who nevertheless succumbed to powerfully seductive forces - philosophical, political, and personal. These include the easy m oral certitudes of the Christian left; the fashionable instrumentalist legal doctrines disseminated at Yale Law School; the situational ethics and power-based political philosophers of a certain strain of 1960s radicalism; the dangerously tempting belief, instilled by influential mentors, in the beneficent potential of government as a force for social progress; the frictionless ease of manipulating the levers of a power in a corrupt one-party state; and the idealized vision of a new kind of political partnership with her husband that proved impossible to realize." In Brock's world, those forces clearly are negative, and he spends the rest of the book showing how Hillary's actions were negative as well. Along the way, he analyzes the strangely symbiotic relationship of Hillary Rodham and Bill Clinton, obviously feeling that she is the brains of the outfit who gave up a lucrative legal career for the love and vision of a husband who did not always return her loyalty. Why? Brock portrays Hillary's father, Hugh Rodham, as a man difficult to please and his daughter as a woman determined to win him over. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.