Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Packnett Touched Many Lives, Stood Up for Important Causes

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Packnett Touched Many Lives, Stood Up for Important Causes

Article excerpt

THERE'S A void today at Del Monico's Diner.

The Rev. Ronald Packnett, pastor of Central Baptist Church, was a fixture at the restaurant. He could be found at the restaurant at Delmar Boulevard and Euclid Avenue almost every morning, chowing down on one of their hearty pancakes-and-sausage breakfasts. And he had a passion for Del Monico's fried chicken legs.

Packnett, who died Tuesday at 45 after a long illness, called restaurant matriarch Eva Bobo his mother away from home. His mother lives in Chicago. The Rev. Gary Tyler was busy working at Del Monico's on Tuesday when he learned of Packnett's death. He said Packnett was his mentor. "I was an associate pastor at Greater Paradise," Tyler said. "Rev. Packnett heard me preach and invited me to his church to speak. Before I knew it, I was speaking there all the time." Packnett got Tyler, 31, the training he needed, and installed him at Central Baptist. Other employees and customers overheard our conversation and joined in. "Rev. Packnett? He married me," one man called out. "He baptized me," yelled another. Bobo couldn't say enough about him. "He helped my granddaughter," she said. "He carried her to church every Sunday, and he had her involved in everything." Packnett loved young people. "He'd always make sure the youth could take part in the National Baptist Convention every year," Tyler said. "That's right," added Bobo, "my granddaughter got to go places she never could have gone." "San Francisco, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, wherever the convention was held, he always made sure that young people could go," Tyler said. "And then he made sure that they weren't just running around when they got to those cities. They always had some kind of class, and they went to places like churches and historical sites." Some spoke of programs he had set up through the church, including one that provided clothes and lunch for the homeless every Tuesday, and a "Rites of Passage" African heritage program. Others talked about the hours he spent visiting sick church members at hospitals and in their homes. If there's one thing a journalist learns early, it's that there are phonies and there are real articles. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.