Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Park Charles Residents Complain about the Way Trustees Enforce Bylaws

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Park Charles Residents Complain about the Way Trustees Enforce Bylaws

Article excerpt

Several residents are accusing trustees of the Park Charles South Homeowners Association of selectively enforcing subdivision bylaws, spying and failing to seek bids for lawn care.

Park Charles South is one of the county's largest communities, with 1 ,150 houses between St. Peters Howell Road and Thoele Road. It has five elected trustees, who enforce the community's bylaws.

A former trustee was one of the most vocal residents Monday night at the community's annual meeting. That resident, Bill Brown, said the board goes after residents who discreetly store boats on their property, but refuses to do anything about commercial vans parked on driveways in the subdivision. Association Vice President Rich Hackenberger said the subdivision's bylaws, adopted in 1975, prohibit any boat, truck, van, trailer, or commercial vehicle from being parked on a residential lot unless it is housed in an approved enclosure, such as a garage. The bylaws allow boats and commercial vehicles to be visible during construction or when being picked up or dropped off. "We do allow people two to three days to clean their boats and trucks," Hackenberger said. Brown was cited for storing his canoe by his house. He says he was in the process of building a room to house the canoe, and says equal strictness is not applied to owners of commercial vans. One van in particular has some residents upset. Anita Brinkman complained about a van parked in a driveway at the corner of Snow Hill Drive and Weatherby Drive. Brinkman said the van obstructs the view of vehicles making a left turn from Snow Hill onto Weatherby. "We can't see kids on bikes or cars approaching from the right," she said. The van has a heating and air conditioning logo on its side. Brinkman and other residents say they have been complaining about it to the board since 1994, but no action has been taken. Rich Hackenberger explained that the community rules, which are based on the county's laws, define a commercial vehicle as a truck more than 23 feet long and weighing more than 12,000 pounds. The van in question falls short of this definition, as do most consumer-model vans. But because of the concerns voiced at the meeting, the board and the residents at the meeting voted to change the subdivision's bylaws. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.