Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Here Is a Highly Abbreviated Chronicle of the Life and Death of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat:

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Here Is a Highly Abbreviated Chronicle of the Life and Death of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat:

Article excerpt

1852: St. Louisans William McKee and William Hill found the Missouri Democrat.

1872: McKee and partner Daniel M. House sell the Democrat and start the Globe.

1875: The papers merge as the Globe-Democrat. 1919: The Globe-Democrat absorbs the St. Louis Republic and has the morning field to itself. 1951: The Post-Dispatch buys and folds its evening competitor, the Star-Times, making St. Louis a two-newspaper city. 1952: Globe editorial writer Louis La Coss wins a Pulitzer Prize - the paper's first - for his editorial on a cheating scandal at West Point. 1955: St. Louisan E. Lansing Ray sells the Globe to the Newhouse newspaper chain. 1959: After a 96-day strike, the Globe sells its plant to the Post-Dispatch and moves down the street to 710 North Tucker Boulevard, into a building without presses. The Globe contracts with the Post to print its paper. Because the Post cannot print two Sunday papers on one set of presses, the Globe drops its Sunday paper - a decision fraught with long-term consequences. 1961: The Globe formalizes its publishing deal with the Post, starting the two papers on two decades of close business connections. 1969: Globe reporters Denny Walsh and Al Delugach win a Pulitzer Prize for exposing union corruption. 1977: The morning Globe crows that it has overtaken the evening Post in circulation - but the Post's fat Sunday papers maintain its edge in advertising. 1978: Jerry Berger column debuts on June 19 - Tony Randall is a sight'em at Opera Theatre. 1979: The Globe and Post merge their advertising, circulation and administrative operations. Their news staffs remain separate and keep up a lively competition. 1983 Nov. 7: Globe Publisher G. Duncan Bauman shocks his staff by announcing that the Globe will publish its last issue on Dec. 31. After that, the Post-Dispatch will have St. Louis to itself but will share its profits with Newhouse well into the 21st century. In Washington, antitrust officials in the Justice Department have other ideas. They pressure Newhouse into seeking a buyer for the Globe, which has a daily circulation of 257,029 to the Post's 249,181. Nov. 29: The Post-Dispatch notifies its unions that when the Globe-Democrat folds, the Post will switch to morning publication. …

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