Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

College Gambling Scandals

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

College Gambling Scandals

Article excerpt

Major gambling arrests and suspensions in college sports:

Jan. 17, 1951 - Henry Poppe and John Byrnes, co-captains of the 1950 Manhattan team, and three other men were arrested in an attempt to fix the Manhattan-DePaul game the previous night. On April 25, 1952, Bronx County Judge James Barrett suspended sentences on Poppe and Byrnes, placed them on probation for three years, and also banned them from professional sports.

Feb. 18, 1951 - Manhattan Distric Attorney Frank Hogan ordered the arrest of CCNY basketball players Ed Warner, Ed Roman, and Edward Gard on bribery charges and two professional gamblers and two intermediaries in a game-fixing scandal that would later involve college teams across the country. Feb. 20, 1951 - Sherman White, LeRoy Smith, and Adolph Biggs of Long Island University were arrested for taking gamblers' bribes. July 24, 1951 - Bradley basketball players Gene Melchiorre, Fred Mann, Bud Grover, Aaron Preece and Jim Kelly admitted taking bribes from gamblers to hold down scores in two games. Oct. 20, 1951 - Alex Groza, Ralph Beard and Dale Barnstable were arrested for accepting $500 bribes to shave points in a game at Madison Square Garden in New York on March 14, 1949. Groza and Beard were suspended from professional basketball by NBA president Maurice Podoloff. On April 29, 1952, Judge Saul Streit gave suspended sentences to Groza, Beard and Barnstable and placed them on indefinite probation. On Nov. 6, 1952, a judge barred Groza, Beard and Barnstable from all sports for three years. March 2, 1952 - Bill Spivey, Kentucky's All-America center, was barred from athletics at the university. Jan. 10, 1954 - Jack Molinas of the Fort Wayne Pistons was suspended for gambling. May 17, 1962 - Jack Molinas was arrested on charges that he headed a ring that fixed college games. Players from Utah, Bowling Green, Alabama and the College of the Pacific testified against him. Two professional gamblers, Aaron Wagman and Joseph Hacken, were arrested for fixing games, and 37 players from 22 schools were caught in the sweep. Molinas was convicted on Jan. 8, 1963 and later sentenced to 10-15 years in prison. …

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