Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Much Ado about Not Very Much

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Much Ado about Not Very Much

Article excerpt

The decision by the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States to abolish its 50-year-old ban on broadcast advertising of hard liquor has evoked a chorus of well-meaning protests - many of them yielding more sound and fury than good sense. For President Bill Clinton and others who are calling on the industry to reverse its decision, the issue is about the dangers of exposing children to the wrong kind of messages. There is something to this argument, but not as much as is being made of it.

Beer and wine have been advertised - and glamorized - on TV for decades. Though it takes less hard liquor to get drunk than it does beer or wine, enough consumption of either of these heavily advertised products leaves one just as impaired as 80 proof scotch does. Underage drinking is, of course, a problem, and perhaps exposing young people to ads glamorizing hard liquor will contribute to it. But so do pervasive ads for beer and wine, and not only on TV. Should beer and wine as well as hard liquor ads be banned from all media for the sake of our children? …

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