Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Million Mentors Black Men Vow to Carry out March's Intent

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Million Mentors Black Men Vow to Carry out March's Intent

Article excerpt

JEREMY RHONE, a 12-year-old from Pasadena Hills, believes the trip he took to Washington with his father one year ago to attend the Million Man March helped him grow up.

"I got a sense of responsibility," he said. "I have to go out and get my education so I can be part of the black revolution - getting a job in a high place so I can help the black community."

The march also had an impact on Jeremy's father, Toryn C. Rhone, 38, who vowed he'd spend more time with his family and extend a helping hand to young African-American men in the St. Louis area. Exactly one year after the historic march, black men like Rhone also say they're investing more time in their communities. "I am much more focused on spending quality time with my son," said Rhone. "It is not just going to games."w In the last year, Rhone has spent hours talking to his son about manhood. They go to athletic events and camp together. Right after the march, they went hunting. Rhone believes the confidence young men learn in the outdoors carries over to their urban lives. Rhone has taken groups of African-American Boy Scouts camping, mainly instructing them in archery. He wants to become a certified hunting instructor through the Missouri Department of Conservation. His hope is to train young black men in hunting skills to keep the "spirit of the Million Man March alive." Rhone, a manager for United Parcel Service, says he has a "conservative outlook." Since the march, he said he felt more connection and less apprehension with the black men he encountered on the streets. Marcelle Rhone noticed the post-march change in her husband. "He is much more fired up about getting out in the community and working with young people, teaching and doing what he could do to help young men." For John Bordeaux, the march was a family thing. Bordeaux, 50, took his son John Anthony Jr., 26; grandson Mark Anthony, 11; and nephew Jean-Claude, 12. In the same spirit, Bordeaux plans to answer Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan's call to gather today outside the United Nations building in New York City for the World Day of Atonement. Bordeaux, a contractor, believes powerful things happen when black people - men especially - gather for the sake of their own community. …

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