Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Mrs. Clinton's Aide Was Conduit for $50,000 Gift Went to Democratic National Committee but Is Being Returned

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Mrs. Clinton's Aide Was Conduit for $50,000 Gift Went to Democratic National Committee but Is Being Returned

Article excerpt

A Taiwanese-American businessman gave a $50,000 campaign donation to Hillary Rodham Clinton's chief of staff in 1995 during a visit to the White House with six Chinese officials, administration aides said Wednesday.

The money was delivered to Margaret Williams and passed along to the Democratic National Committee. The party announced last week that the donation was being returned because of insufficient information about its source. It was not known how the money had been received.

White House spokeswoman Ann Lewis said Williams recalls getting a check from the businessman, Johnny Chung, at the White House and telling him that it would be passed along to the party. Party records show that $50,000 from Chung came into the party on March 17. Chung brought the Chinese government officials to see Clinton deliver a radio address at the White House on March 11, 1995. Presidential aides, speaking on condition of anonymity, contended that Williams did not violate the Hatch Act, which prohibits federal employees from knowingly receiving a political contribution. The federal regulations that accompany the act say that "receipt" of campaign contributions doesn't include handling, disbursing or accounting functions for donations, the aides said. Chung has given more than $300,000 to the Democratic Party since 1994. Also Wednesday: Representatives of the Buddhist temple where Vice President Al Gore took part in a fund-raising event gave documents to a federal grand jury in the Justice Department investigation of campaign financing. Ron Nessim, attorney for the Hsi Lai Buddhist Temple in Hacienda Heights, Calif., said the temple was complying with a subpoena for documents. Religious groups are not supposed to host such events because of their tax-exempt status as nonprofit charitable institutions. Kenneth Lyons, president of the 120,000-member National Association of Government Employees, said Gore should resign because he used government-owned telephones in his White House office to solicit contributions. Officials said Gore misspoke when he said he used a telephone card from the Democratic National Committee for White House calls to solicit campaign money. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.