Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Budget Plan Survives Senate Challenges but Gop Leaders in House Struggle to Control Troops on Amendment

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Budget Plan Survives Senate Challenges but Gop Leaders in House Struggle to Control Troops on Amendment

Article excerpt

The Senate defeated the first of a host of challenges to the balanced budget amendment Monday.

Meanwhile, House Republican leaders, struggling to keep their troops in line, postponed further action on their bill.

The House Judiciary Committee decision to postpone a vote on the constitutional amendment until after the Senate finishes its work put in doubt plans for a final House vote on Feb. 26. Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Ill., the Judiciary Committee chairman, called off a meeting of his panel last week after it became apparent that he did not have the votes present to defeat a Democratic substitute that would have excluded the Social Security trust fund from balanced budget calculations. Hyde rescheduled the meeting for today, but his spokesman, Sam Stratman, said Monday that that plan, too, had changed. "We're waiting for the Senate to complete work on the resolution," the spokesman said. Several committee Republicans have indicated they would support the Democratic version, offered by Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., which the GOP leadership contends would undermine its bill. Republicans hold a 20-15 majority on the committee. In an attempt to prevent further desertions, House Majority Leader Dick Armey and the GOP whip, Rep. Tom DeLay, both of Texas, met privately last week with a small group of Republicans concerned about the measure's impact on Social Security. Senate Vote The Senate, meanwhile, voted 64-35 to reject a proposal by Sen. Richard J. Durbin, D-Ill., to allow the balanced budget requirement to be waived by a simple majority vote in times of serious economic problems. Ten Democrats joined the Republicans in voting against the measure. The base plan offered by Republicans would require a three-fifths majority to approve a deficit in any fiscal year or to raise the national debt ceiling. Durbin's was the first of several Democratic versions that Republicans charged were aimed at sidetracking their bill. Senate Democrats also are seeking to exclude Social Security, create a separate capital budget for long-term investments or exempt various programs from balanced budget considerations. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.