Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Band Member Says Time Is Right for Monkees Reunion

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Band Member Says Time Is Right for Monkees Reunion

Article excerpt

`Hey, Hey, It's the Monkees'

When: 7 tonight

Where: Channel 30 ***** MIKE Nesmith insists he's never been the reluctant Monkee, only the too-busy-to-be-bothered Monkee. Monkee see? Sure. Monkee do? Sorry, guys, maybe next time. Stay in touch, though. His myriad other pursuits included feature films, pioneering work in music videos, his own First National Band and the 1985 NBC series "Television Parts." Meanwhile, Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones and Peter Tork clung to the Monkee phenomenon as best they could. "I had never been in sync with them," Nesmith says in a telephone interview. "We had always been in different parts of the country doing different things. The other guys would get together and do shows and would always ask if I was interested. I would always say, `Yeah,' but something else would come up that was a conflict and we could never get it together. That was generally interpreted to mean I didn't want anything to do with the Monkees. But now the proof is in the pudding. Here it is and here I am." He's referring to tonight's "Hey, Hey, It's the Monkees," a one-hour ABC special (7 p.m. on Channel 30) written and directed by Nesmith. His premise: The Monkees wasn't really canceled by NBC in 1968. The foursome are still sharing a "Monkee pad" while trying to figure out a story line for episode 781 of the series. "We're still playing cheap dance gigs and trying to think about how we manage our lives and ourselves," says Nesmith, who was raised in Dallas. "Except we're all grown up." He attempts to explain further. Bear with him. "It's a little bit like going back to your parents' house, and the garage has been turned into a den. It's not that your parents have had more children. It's that you've had children. So we're all the same. One thing I wanted to solve is that if you watch a child grow up and you look into his or her eyes, there's a certain pathos to that. It can be sad in some ways. But if you look at a grown man or woman, and you see the child in them, that's an inspiring moment. …

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