Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Lawyer for O.J. Simpson Drides Evidence, Says It Was Planted

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Lawyer for O.J. Simpson Drides Evidence, Says It Was Planted

Article excerpt

A member of O.J. Simpson's original defense team argued from a wheelchair Thursday that Simpson was being framed again for two killings.

"A criminal case is not like fine wine. It doesn't get better over time," said the attorney, Robert Blasier. He warned jurors to be wary when witnesses come in and say: "Oh, I was mistaken. It looks worse for Mr. Simpson now."

Blasier argued in his summation that the flaws in the criminal case that led to Simpson's acquittal on murder charges 15 months ago have not been wiped away and, in fact, are more glaring than ever. "Our defense on the case of physical evidence is very simple," he said. "You can't trust it. . . . It's been tampered with. It was planted." Blasier, the defense specialist in DNA and physical evidence, suffers from severe genetic back problems and left the case last month to undergo a radical spinal fusion. His return to argue the case from his wheelchair added a dramatic twist to the finale of a wrongful death civil trial that has pitted Simpson against the families of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman. When Blasier completed his arguments late Thursday, Dan Leonard, another defense attorney, talked to jurors about the 31 photographs that plaintiffs say show Simpson wearing the same style Bruno Magli shoes as those that authorities say left behind bloody footprints at the crime scene. Echoing Simpson's testimony, Leonard insisted that Simpson had never bought or owned a pair of the expensive Italian shoes and suggested that the photos were fakes. "How come these photographs don't surface until March of 1996, basically two years after the murder?" he asked. "And how come when they emerge, they end up in the National Enquirer? There's one answer: Money, dough." Blasier illustrated his carefully organized presentation with slides, photo blow-ups and a Tinkertoy model of the DNA structure, arguing that evidence had been "grossly oversold" to jurors. …

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