Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Kenneth Starr Wimps Out

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Kenneth Starr Wimps Out

Article excerpt

The fear of James Carville's partisan attack, the lure of the easy life at "Malibu U." and a warped view of duty led Kenneth Starr to shirk the responsibility he sought as independent counsel just before the moment of prosecutorial decision.

He has reminded us that even a man who has led an exemplary life can wimp out in the end. Never on a question as vital as criminality in the White House has a public servant left behind such a monumental pile of unfinished business.

With his Saturday Night Self-Massacre, Starr brought shame on the legal profession by walking out on his client - the people of the United States - leaving us alone at the courthouse door. He further undermined the office of independent counsel by ridiculing as "a monomaniacal function" its requirements of full-time dedication and definitive closure. There's no denying this is a great week for cover-up artists and stonewallers, contemptuous and hushed-up witnesses, abusers of power and obstructers of justice. No wonder the Clintonites are smirking out loud; tipped off to Starr's incipient bailout, they planted a phony story in Arkansas about "mock trials" showing a Hillary triumph, thereby adding to his momentum out the door. And it's a sad day for taxpayers cheated out of S&L funds; for innocent government employees smeared by a politicized FBI; for 1,000 private citizens whose personal files were wrongly requisitioned by White House political operatives. There's no gainsaying the damage to justice done by our craven counse l's cut-and-run. But in many of these cases, justice delayed need not be justice denied. What has to be done? First, create a vacancy right away. The notion of a lame-duck prosecutor hanging around until Aug. 1, when the urgent needs of Pepperdine University take precedence over the country's, is abhorrent. If indictments are to be brought, decisions must be made by a prosecutor ready to supervise the trials. Starr thinks he has created a mini-Justice Department with a "culture" capable of running on automatic pilot. Although the two veteran prosecutors he hired last week - Thomas Dawson of Mississippi and Solomon Wisenberg of San Antonio - are auguries of trials to come, the "office" lacks now what it turns out to have lacked for three years: a strong executive to break through orchestrated White House resistance. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.