Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Dan Quayle at Halftime

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Dan Quayle at Halftime

Article excerpt

Outside the Quilted Bear, a popular breakfast spot, sits the sporty Jeep that Marilyn gave him last month on his 50th birthday. Inside, the former vice president sits at the corner table where he regularly talks with politically interested people passing through Phoenix.

Ralph Reed, head of the Christian Coalition, was here recently. There will be others. Dan Quayle, formerly of Indianapolis, spent much of his youth here - he went to high school just down the road - but he is not settling down here. Seventeen years after being elected senator at age 33, he is running for president.

Although there is gray around his temples, he still looks boyish. But his inner landscape is more severe. He has resolved to seek something like redemption. He was a diligent, respected, rising senator before his abrupt and unhappy elevation to the Republican national ticket, for which he was ill-prepared. Today, he is more remembered for misspelling "potato" than for being right - prematurely so - about Murphy Brown and the nation's most serious social problem. Whatever happened to Murphy's baby? Has he gone away to school already? It seems like only yesterday that he was born to Murphy, the character in the TV sitcom. Although unmarried, she chose to have a child, and thereby became the toast of advanced thinkers, symbol of Emancipated Woman - "our bodies, our choices" and all that. Actually, it was May 1992, just before the country awoke to the social unraveling caused by illegitimacy. Quayle endured an acid rain of ridicule for arguing that the entertainment industry was irresponsible to glamorize and trivialize having children out of wedlock as just another "lifestyle" choice and a matter of moral indifference. However, soon he seemed prescient, even to his cultured despisers. An Atlantic magazine cover story proclaimed "Dan Quayle Was Right. …

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