Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Board Draws Fire, Support for Setting `Temporary' 25 MPH Limit on Road

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Board Draws Fire, Support for Setting `Temporary' 25 MPH Limit on Road

Article excerpt

The Frontenac Board of Aldermen has set the speed limit at 25 miles an hour on a curvy one-half-mile section of Geyer Road between two subdivisions, Steeplechase Lane and Huntleigh Manor.

Last month, the board reduced the speed limit to 20 from 30 and placed a stop sign before a 90-degree turn near the Sisters of Mercy Center.

Both measures were meant to slow drivers through the dangerous section because of 18 accidents there in the past three years. However, some residents complained about the new measures. City Administrator Michael Schoedel says Booker and Associates, an engineering firm, will conduct a topographical study of the stretch at a cost of $3,150 and then propose a plan for changing the curve. The speed limit of 25 miles an hour and the stop sign will be in effect until the road is changed. Last week, both residents and aldermen presented opposing views on the changes. Creighton Calfee, who lives off Geyer Road, said he opposed the stop sign and speed limit. "When the sign went in, I stopped at it, and a car almost rear-ended me," Calfee said. "The curve needs to be fixed." Resident Bruce Klamer, who lives on Briar Ridge Lane, also opposed the speed limit and suggested a warning sign. He said the reduced speed limit covered too long a stretch of roadway "to treat a problem on one corner." "Let's deal with the one corner and not the whole blessed Geyer Road," Klamer said. "I'm more concerned about the foliage and trees planted at that spot that you can't see around." But Avis Frick, who lives at the 90-degree curve, said she had seen too many bad accidents at the site. "In Frontenac the speed limit is 20 miles per hour where it's not posted," Frick said. "That means it's 20 miles per hour in the subdivisions, in front of your house. I've seen curves not as bad as this one with speed limits of 15 or even 10 miles per hour. The chief told me he caught someone doing 46 miles per hour through there the other day." Bill Durbin, who lives off Countryside Lane, said the curve could not be driven at 30 mph, and resident Joy Erickson, who lives off Geyer, presented about 10 signatures to the board from her neighbors who favored the stop sign and lower speed limit. …

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