Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Troubled Waters U.S. Catch of the Day Likely Caught in China or Thailand

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Troubled Waters U.S. Catch of the Day Likely Caught in China or Thailand

Article excerpt

Even in the cradle of the U.S. fishing industry, diners are more likely to get a shrimp from Thailand or a scallop from China than the local catch of the day.

The United States imported twice as much seafood as it exported last year, running up a $3.7 billion trade deficit.

The reason: Domestic fishermen can't catch enough of the species we like to eat, and not all the fish they do catch have caught on with consumers. "It's really shocking how much we import," James Anderson, editor of Seafood Market Analyst, said Wednesday. "By anybody's measure, more than half of what we eat is imported, easily." That was news to customers at Jimmy's Harborside Restaurant, a fixture on Boston's Fish Pier since 1924, where diners can watch the trawlers through the picture window. "You're serious?" said Bob Golden of Newton, who just finished his lobster lunch, which probably came from Canadian waters. "I'm very concerned about it." Last year was at least the 26th in a row that the United States has run a seafood trade deficit. …

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