Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Frame Dad - in a Photo, That Is - for Father's Day

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Frame Dad - in a Photo, That Is - for Father's Day

Article excerpt

BEAUTIFULLY FRAMED photographs always make excellent gifts. And for Father's Day, which calls for a personal present, they are ideal.

What could be more appropriate for this holiday than an elegant frame that holds a picture of you and your dad?

There are many ways to frame and display family photos creatively. Here are some ideas: Buy lots of inexpensive wood frames and paint them in your father's favorite colors. Fill them with family photos. Small frames can be clustered together on a desk; larger ones can be hung on the wall. Either way, they make a "family album" that can be appreciated every day. Try something extra simple. Two panes of glass show off photos (or sketches) perfectly. Have a glazier cut two pieces of glass to the desired size and ask that he hone the edges to smooth them. Place your photo on one piece, lay the other one on top, and secure the pieces together with stationery-store binder clips. Buy a new wallet and fill it with snapshots before giving it to your father. Embellish a plain frame. Use hot glue to attach stones, pine cones or other small, attractive objects to a frame. Cluster them together, covering the frame completely. Make a color photocopy of a beloved snapshot and turn it into a Father's Day card, gift tag or wrapping paper. Restore and frame old family photographs. For a valuable image, consult a conservator, who can clean and mend a damaged photo with expertise. A photo lab can create a new version from your original. With airbrushing and retouching, cracks and stains can disappear. Sometimes even missing pieces can be filled in. Instead of putting an old picture in a new, modern frame, search antiques stores and flea markets for a vintage frame in a style that suits the photo. Take this opportunity to have home movies transferred to videotape. But keep in mind that videotapes don't last forever. Their life span is about 10 to 20 years, so make a mental note that you'll need to make a new set of tapes eventually if you plan to pass the tapes on to another generation. Sort through family snapshots and put them into an album. …

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