Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

My Mother Taught Me Love

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

My Mother Taught Me Love

Article excerpt

Mother's Day this year will be the first I have spent without my mother, who died April 24 at age 84.

When Andrew Jackson's mother died, he wrote, "There never was a woman like her. She was gentle as a dove and brave as a lioness. . . . The memory of my mother and her teachings were, after all, the only capital I had to start life with, and on that capital I have made my way."

The same could be said of my mother. Mothers today are regarded, at least by popular culture, as more biological beings than builders or sustainers of homes. My mother had not worked as an employee for six decades, but the obituary writer in one newspaper called her a "secretary" because she briefly held such a job in the 1930s before meeting and marrying my Dad. Why isn't making a home more highly regarded? She made our home and, as a friend said, she expressed a love that shaped my life. Mom and I "kept the home fires burning" while Dad was away during World War II. Like many families, we gave him something to look forw ard to when he came home. Unlike some, we were fortunate that he did come home. Before career women hogged the spotlight and eclipsed homemakers, before radical feminism reduced men to wimps and reduced women to "equality" with men (not to be confused with equal pay, equal treatment and justice), before day-care centers and two-income families (some of necessity, others to maintain the pace of conspicuous consumption), before "no-fault" divorce, before Cosmopolitan magazine's preoccupation with orgasms and affairs as the supposed primary concern of all women . . . before all this, there was a certain type of woman known as a Lady. My mother was a Lady. She wasn't stuck-up, as are "the ladies who lunch" in Stephen Sondheim's song. Her doctor called her "stately," which is exactly right. It means she had dignity, acquired through a good upbringing modeled by her parents, and enhanced by a philosophy and later a faith she voluntarily practiced through much of her adult life. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.